United Guam Marathon 2018

my first marathon

The week after the marathon it was all anyone asked me about. I was excited to share, but it didn’t feel real. People talk about out-of-body experiences and I think United Guam Marathon was that. It feels like it didn’t happen to me or that I dreamt it. If it weren’t for the fact that I couldn’t sit for days after I would think I made it up in my head.

Originally I had no interest in ever running a marathon. It just sounded too painful. However, as my triathlon dreams have grown and evolved I’ve been thinking more and more about 140.6. With that, comes the inevitable marathon at the end of a full Ironman. For that, I needed to know that I could complete a marathon before that day. That I’d already done it once. So here we are.

under training & the Expo

I made a couple critical errors before the marathon. First mistake was signing up for it when it was only two weeks after Ironman Taiwan 70.3. The second was that we went on holiday to Vietnam with friends the week before the race – so not much training was done there. More importantly, I should have respected a little more of a mental break between events. I wasn’t excited or motivated going into the race. I felt burnt out and tired.

Going from racing, to vacation, to hosting a visitor and then to have the marathon was just a LOT. I hadn’t run at all the week prior to the marathon. Realizing too late that the MapMyRun plan I had been following was off and not setting me up for success did nothing for my confidence. I hadn’t even completed any runs over 15 miles prior to the race. Not ideal. Luckily, I went to the Expo anyway to pick up my packet and that put a little pep in my step.

Hafa Adai is Chamorran for ‘Hello’ and is used much like ‘aloha’ in Hawaii. A true island style welcome to the Expo!
The course map had little images of what was at each aide station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After registration, we walked through and saw all the different booths of local gym and fitness companies. They also had island dancers and fire throwers on the stage. There’s nothing to make you psyched to race like mingling with other athletes all chatting about the race.

Marathon Morning

1:30 am is when my alarm went off. Two and half hours of sleep. Why, do I do this to myself. My sleep brain considered just skipping the race.. I mean why not.. It is just money? But I got out of bed and got my gear together. I decided to run with a 2L Camelback full of plain water, 3-4 packs of Honey Stinger chews, and my newly acquired Base Salts tube. The weather that day was set to be overcast and raining. It always says it is going to rain so I always take those predictions with a grain of salt.

Conditions

This morning the temperature was 79 F at 3:00 am and would rise up to 86 F over the day. The humidity was 98% – no joke! We would be lucky to have the cloud cover. Parking was a little confusing at the race and it turns out I could not park at the Hilton as I had planned. So I lost 15 minutes having to go back and find a new place to park and then walk/job to the park where the race start was.

the start

Confessional: I missed the start of the race. šŸ™‚ The gun went off at 3:00 am and I saw the pack go out right as I was dropping my gear at bag drop! Key difference between my triathlons and running races haha I care too much about my tris to be late, and then there’s the whole ‘transition closes’ factor. The runs are just for fun! But it took me not even .3 mi to catch the back of the pack. Since this race started with a large hill climb it was easy for me to catch the group.

running in the darkĀ 

It was a strange race because you ran nearly the entire thing in the pitch black. I ran with a headlight for some of it but the road was lit well enough that I ended up taking it off. I loved being able to run it with headphones and I listen to two hour long podcasts while I ran! Listening to the ladies of Bitch Sesh rehash the previous weeks Real Housewives episodes really took my mind off how long I’d been going. We ran from ‘town’ all the way to the Naval Base.. and back again. The only spectators were the people at the aide stations, which I am told were themed but since I didn’t stop at any of them I didn’t notice. They did have a live band and some people cheering at the gate to the base which was a nice pick me up at the turn around point.

a little help from my friendsĀ 

Around mile 20 my dear friend Amanda, of Pineapple Yoga, left me a little encouragement and my favorite blue gatorade outside her house. I ditched my, now empty, Camelback over her gate and carried on feeling the love. About 5 miles out from the finish, I fell in step with a longer military looking guy. It was pouring rain now but it was starting to get light out. This man and I didn’t say anything to each other but kept pushing forward.

Our pace was aggressive for 21 miles in closer to 8:00 min/mi than I thought I could do. I didn’t want to get dropped so I turned up the tunes and kept gritting it out. It was also at this stage that I increased my Base Salts from 1 lick per mile to 2 licks per mile. A little side note here: I think the Base Salts single handedly saved me from cramping. I had not used them before this race and I am SOLD. They were amazing and I only had mild pain in my hamstrings and quads those last few miles thanks the product.Ā 

a private victory

I crossed the finish line in a comfortable 4 hr and 33 min. No one was there for me, no one to hang out with after I was done, except me. A massage and a banana completed my mini recovery at the post race party. I walked around the post race party for a little bit and enjoyed the beach before heading home. All before 9am!

I really try to remember and enjoy the positives of this race and not the things I “didn’t accomplish”. I did it for me. To prove to myself that I could and I would. The pace I had hoped for didn’t happen but I ran the whole time and I finished. Moreover, I had fun. I really enjoyed this race on this island I’ve called home for the last year. It was a special race to have as my first. And let’s be honest, probably not my last.

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