Stomp The Pedal Review #stompthestyle

There’s not a cyclist out there who doesn’t feel giddy when a new kit arrives in the mail! I am no exception to that rule. I was so excited when a new package arrived with some goodies from a new company called Stomp The Pedal. My IG friend Natarsha Tremayne, of @irontarsh and irontarshweekendwarrior.com ,  followed her dream and stepped into the competitive world of cycling apparel. And, she’s killing it.

Stomp The Pedal \ Options

Image courtesy of stompthepedal.co

Right now, STP has four main design options available. The ‘Flor Flor’ is a bright yellow, pink, and blue kit that has some flowery and plant inspiration. The ‘Signature Logo’ is covered in their bike wheel logo (and one of my favorites!) and comes in a couple different bright highly visible colors. In addition to plain black for girls like me who consider black THE only color.  The newest is the Spring/Summer Botanicals collection. This has a beautiful fern & flower print designed by a university student in UK. It comes in two color options – red and a mint/pink. Finally, there is the Gatsby collection which is the one that made me stop in my tracks and buy immediately. ‘Tallulah’ which is a pale pink base with 1920’s inspired geometric print in navy and gold is what I bought. The other two options are the ‘Greta’ which is the inverse of this – navy base with pale pink and gold pattern. Lastly, the ‘Evelyn’ which is pale pink with a gold outline of the geometric pattern. Honestly, they’re all gorgeous and it is hard for me to pick a favorite.

The Gatsby Collection: Tallulah

Stomp The Pedal \ Fabric

I have heard the term buttery soft a few times before but didn’t really get it. Then I felt this kit and the sleeves are buttery soft. The sleeves are so delicate and comfortable I could walk around in it all day. The cut of this kit is super flattering with a slightly longer back and taper in the front. The jersey is primarily made out of bi-elastic polyester and polyester fibre with yarn finess of 50. Candidly this means little to me but what I do know is this jersey is so comfy to ride in.

Stomp The Pedal \ Fun Features

This jersey looks so classy on and one of the reasons it does is its invisible zipper. The camlock concealing zipper means the front of this jersey looks super streamlined.  There are three back pockets for snacks, phones, or small water bottles. One of my favorite features is the small zip pocket on the side for valuables like keys or cash.

  

 

Overall I love this jersey! I was super impressed and this kit definitely exceeded my expectations.  I rode in it through Park City, Utah with my friend Matt and definitely worked up a sweat with the climbs. Never did I feel sweaty or too hot/cold. The breathability and comfort of this jersey meant I felt great both during our ride and during our coffee stop. I can not wait to order more jerseys from Stomp The Pedal and the matching cycling bibs! Stay tuned to find out how the bibs match the top in comfort and design!

Coco’s Crossing 5K OWS

Guam’s Crossing

How I came to this race is a story of FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out). I had found a group of military spouses that did ocean swims together 3x a week on base. Thanks to the power of Facebook & social media I was able to connect with these ladies. When I joined the group just making it a mile was a challenge. These ladies were swimming anywhere from 2-3 miles. They were training for Coco’s. A quick side note about this impressive group: The group has always been so welcoming to any swimmer of any ability. No one gets left behind or alone in the ocean. There is always someone of your ability that you can pair up with. Within not too long these fearless ladies had convinced me that I could do an open water swim race too!

Training for the Crossing

The Coco’s Crossing as it was pitched to me was an open ocean swim from the small islet of Coco’s back to the main island of Guam. They offer three different distances a 3k,

Gab Gab’s ocean 71 meter pool offers beginning swimmers a taste of swimming in the ocean while being protected and easy to get out of if needed

5k, and a 10k for the especially brave. After convincing some of my collegiate swimmer friends to sign up for the 5k with I decided I’d need to start getting in some longer distance swims. Luckily for us on Guam we have to much protected reef in the harbor that you can literally swim as far as you want. So, 3 times a week I would swim anywhere from 1.5 to 2.5 miles with my Gab Gab ladies (Gab Gab being the name of the beach). I quickly found my place in the pack. If I wanted to swim and no one was available I would head to Gab Gab’s pool to be in the ocean but also visible if something should happen (like a cramp or sea sickness).

I used to have complaints about the ocean, yet the more I swam the more accustomed I became. The saltiness. The waves. Fear of sharks. The first two I just got used to – however, the later took some work. As well as some rationalizing that there really aren’t any sharks that will get you here. At the very end of one of our swim routes you can occasionally see our resident Black Tip Reef Shark, Rita. When this happens, we simply turn around and leave her to her business.

Ready to Cross… or not

We all got to the race site early on the morning of the race. I felt excited and amped up by the fun atmosphere. It was at the point I was looking for when the ferry times were that I realized I’d made a tactical error. Thinking I’d signed up for the swim from Coco’s and back (a crossing, if you will) I was expecting to have to take a ferry over to the island to start. As it turns out the 3k is the race that crosses the lagoon. The 5k and 10k are a true ocean swim in a triangle course. Disappointed though I was, I focused my energies on understanding the new course I had to swim.

All oiled up pre race (to protect from Jelly Fish!) with the 1st & 2nd place male finishers for their Age Group

All the swimmers applied Vasoline all over their skin to protect against Jelly Fish. Last year, 2017, we were really luck as there really weren’t any. However, in previous years it has been really bad I was told. This was my first athletic event on Guam and I wasn’t prepared for the differences. For example, they only had three large triangle markers out on the course. Meaning you really couldn’t see your turn buoy when you were in the water until you were quite close. We were told that if we needed help to stop and put your swim cap in the air. Yet, the small number of kayakers meant that no one could get to you fast. If they could see you at all.

The Race

The 5k and 10k races started together in a mass start. We had to do 2 laps while the 10k folks had 4 laps. The gun went off and the washing machine started. Bodies flailing everywhere trying jockey for space. Not too long after the start it began to rain. This made visibility pretty poor. The water was super warm, around 86/88 F and visibility to the bottom was probably 40 feet the conditions couldn’t have been better. My first lap went well; I could see people, didn’t feel alone, and felt like I was doing okay. It was lap two that really hurt. I was pretty fatigued, cramping in my legs, and becoming increasingly stressed. A couple times I wanted to stop for a minute but couldn’t see any help around. The pack had thinned out and I felt alone. I couldn’t make it. I wasn’t going to make it. The next turn buoy was not in site and I didn’t know mow much longer I could go.

The very last leg of the race had some moderate swell to it. Conditions that now a year later wouldn’t phase me. Back then however, it had me stressed and crying into my goggles. I just wanted to be done.  I  persevered and struggled through and finally got out of the water 2 hours and 2 minutes later. As soon as I was done I walked straight back. Not stopping for my husband or friends who had finished long before. I knew the water works were coming and didn’t want to bring the day down. Tears of frustration and disappointment are a funny thing. They’re not easy to explain and they definitely aren’t stoppable.

Post Crossing Party

The Coco’s Crossing was the hardest thing I’d ever done. It was challenging, scary, fun, beautiful, and 100% worth it. After the race and the awards ceremony we hung out a bit and enjoyed Merizo. Ate some hafaloah (flavored shaved ice) and rehydrated then went home for a good nap.

We were planning to race again this year but our move date got moved up so we will be unable to. I am so sure this years race will be even better than the last. The people behind this event care so much about making it fun and safe. It was a tough race for me and my own expectations for myself were not met but I would recommend this race in a heartbeat. If you are new to Guam or just love open water swimming this is a must do event.

For more event info click here: Coco’s Crossing Series

Registration Closes: Friday May 18th, 2018 at Midnight

No Day Of Registration (trust us, my friend tried this last year)

Show Time: 6:00 AM   Go Time : 7:00 AM

FAQ and information on the course and rules click here

United Guam Marathon 2018

my first marathon

The week after the marathon it was all anyone asked me about. I was excited to share, but it didn’t feel real. People talk about out-of-body experiences and I think United Guam Marathon was that. It feels like it didn’t happen to me or that I dreamt it. If it weren’t for the fact that I couldn’t sit for days after I would think I made it up in my head.

Originally I had no interest in ever running a marathon. It just sounded too painful. However, as my triathlon dreams have grown and evolved I’ve been thinking more and more about 140.6. With that, comes the inevitable marathon at the end of a full Ironman. For that, I needed to know that I could complete a marathon before that day. That I’d already done it once. So here we are.

under training & the Expo

I made a couple critical errors before the marathon. First mistake was signing up for it when it was only two weeks after Ironman Taiwan 70.3. The second was that we went on holiday to Vietnam with friends the week before the race – so not much training was done there. More importantly, I should have respected a little more of a mental break between events. I wasn’t excited or motivated going into the race. I felt burnt out and tired.

Going from racing, to vacation, to hosting a visitor and then to have the marathon was just a LOT. I hadn’t run at all the week prior to the marathon. Realizing too late that the MapMyRun plan I had been following was off and not setting me up for success did nothing for my confidence. I hadn’t even completed any runs over 15 miles prior to the race. Not ideal. Luckily, I went to the Expo anyway to pick up my packet and that put a little pep in my step.

Hafa Adai is Chamorran for ‘Hello’ and is used much like ‘aloha’ in Hawaii. A true island style welcome to the Expo!

The course map had little images of what was at each aide station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After registration, we walked through and saw all the different booths of local gym and fitness companies. They also had island dancers and fire throwers on the stage. There’s nothing to make you psyched to race like mingling with other athletes all chatting about the race.

Marathon Morning

1:30 am is when my alarm went off. Two and half hours of sleep. Why, do I do this to myself. My sleep brain considered just skipping the race.. I mean why not.. It is just money? But I got out of bed and got my gear together. I decided to run with a 2L Camelback full of plain water, 3-4 packs of Honey Stinger chews, and my newly acquired Base Salts tube. The weather that day was set to be overcast and raining. It always says it is going to rain so I always take those predictions with a grain of salt.

Conditions

This morning the temperature was 79 F at 3:00 am and would rise up to 86 F over the day. The humidity was 98% – no joke! We would be lucky to have the cloud cover. Parking was a little confusing at the race and it turns out I could not park at the Hilton as I had planned. So I lost 15 minutes having to go back and find a new place to park and then walk/job to the park where the race start was.

the start

Confessional: I missed the start of the race. 🙂 The gun went off at 3:00 am and I saw the pack go out right as I was dropping my gear at bag drop! Key difference between my triathlons and running races haha I care too much about my tris to be late, and then there’s the whole ‘transition closes’ factor. The runs are just for fun! But it took me not even .3 mi to catch the back of the pack. Since this race started with a large hill climb it was easy for me to catch the group.

running in the dark 

It was a strange race because you ran nearly the entire thing in the pitch black. I ran with a headlight for some of it but the road was lit well enough that I ended up taking it off. I loved being able to run it with headphones and I listen to two hour long podcasts while I ran! Listening to the ladies of Bitch Sesh rehash the previous weeks Real Housewives episodes really took my mind off how long I’d been going. We ran from ‘town’ all the way to the Naval Base.. and back again. The only spectators were the people at the aide stations, which I am told were themed but since I didn’t stop at any of them I didn’t notice. They did have a live band and some people cheering at the gate to the base which was a nice pick me up at the turn around point.

a little help from my friends 

Around mile 20 my dear friend Amanda, of Pineapple Yoga, left me a little encouragement and my favorite blue gatorade outside her house. I ditched my, now empty, Camelback over her gate and carried on feeling the love. About 5 miles out from the finish, I fell in step with a longer military looking guy. It was pouring rain now but it was starting to get light out. This man and I didn’t say anything to each other but kept pushing forward.

Our pace was aggressive for 21 miles in closer to 8:00 min/mi than I thought I could do. I didn’t want to get dropped so I turned up the tunes and kept gritting it out. It was also at this stage that I increased my Base Salts from 1 lick per mile to 2 licks per mile. A little side note here: I think the Base Salts single handedly saved me from cramping. I had not used them before this race and I am SOLD. They were amazing and I only had mild pain in my hamstrings and quads those last few miles thanks the product. 

a private victory

I crossed the finish line in a comfortable 4 hr and 33 min. No one was there for me, no one to hang out with after I was done, except me. A massage and a banana completed my mini recovery at the post race party. I walked around the post race party for a little bit and enjoyed the beach before heading home. All before 9am!

I really try to remember and enjoy the positives of this race and not the things I “didn’t accomplish”. I did it for me. To prove to myself that I could and I would. The pace I had hoped for didn’t happen but I ran the whole time and I finished. Moreover, I had fun. I really enjoyed this race on this island I’ve called home for the last year. It was a special race to have as my first. And let’s be honest, probably not my last.

Swimming in Ha Long Bay

I love open water swimming.

The challenge. Being one with nature. Experiencing marine life (usually). I take it all in. As I have grown more and more accustomed to it I have looked for ways to incorporate swimming into our holidays. Three days after returning from Taiwan my husband and I joined some friends in Vietnam. Our first leg of the trip was a three day cruise on Ha Long Bay. Ha Long Bay translates to “where the dragon descends into the sea”. Looking at the islets you can see why.

photo courtesy of vietnam-travel.com

About the Bay

Ha Long is located in the South China Sea on the northern coast just south of China. This area of coast is considered a UNESCO Heritage site and is a collection of around 2,000 limestone islets in various shapes and sizes.  Around 1,700 people live in the fishing floating villages dispersed throughout the area. On our third day of our cruise we did tour one of the villages to see how they lived. Compared to the lives we have in the United States it was a different world. We used a company called Indochina Junk for our cruise. Our ship was named the Dragon’s Pearl, a real life pirate ship! Our group of 20 people got to know each other well over the three days. I was not the only swimmer but I was the first one to test out the waters.

Starting the Swim  

On the second morning, after breakfast, I decided that I did not really want to kayak again. We were supposed to do another scenic kayak tour through the islets. I asked our captain if I could swim alongside the kayaks. He looked at me as if I’d grown a second head. This poor Vietnamese man could not understand why anyone would want to get in the chilly water and swim. After going back and forth for a few minutes convincing him I really did want to swim. He agreed and assigned a staff member to act as a guardian kayak for me. I had been getting a little crazy from not having worked out in a few days and needed to stretch out. He told me we were going quite far and I assured him that was fine. I often swim “quite far”. So while our friends Heidi and James were kayaking I jumped in the water to swim at their side. Look for the red cap in the photo below to find Where’s Waldo [ or Ryan 🙂 ]

I’m the small red cap next to the kayak on the right!

Famous Last Words

Upon first jump in the water was chilly but not too bad! That should have been my first red flag. In retrospect, the water was probably around 60-65 degrees. Colder than I should have been in without a wetsuit. The water was murky but tasted clean and surprsingly minimal salinity. Most of the kayak pack was a ways ahead of me but my friends stayed near by. I would stop every so often to listen to the guide talk about the different sites a long the way. About an 40 minutes into the swim I started to wonder when we were going to turn around since I knew we’d already covered over a mile. I was starting to feel pretty cold in my fingers and toes. That being said, I felt confident that if I kept moving I could keep warm enough to make it back. It did not seem like we were turning around soon.

When to call it off and get in the boat…

A little after an hour in which for me was around 2 miles I could feel myself slowing down. Getting my arms around was harder. Kicking was harder. My calves were starting to seize up. The kayak pack had made the curve around the bend. This had me hoping we were making a loop and not going to double back at some point. I made it as far as I felt I safely could- my teeth were chattering and it was messing with my ability to breath. Currents had changed and I could tell that I had been swimming into increasingly colder water. Swimming slowly over to my guardian kayak I asked if I could get in. He said yes and hauled me aboard and quickly paddled around the corner. No sooner had we turned the corner than I could see how close we were to the boat. Another 300-400 meters and I would have been at the boat.

Warming Up, Post Swim

While I was slightly disappointed that I quit so close to the boat. I did get in over 2 miles while experiencing the incredible islets of Vietnam. I got out of the water feeling like a popsicle. The kayak group went to check out a big cave before returning to the boat. I warmed up and felt refreshed and accomplished. My husband brought me a cup of tea while we chatted about the swim and admired the sunset.  We swam the next morning around the bay that we were parked in but did not go nearly as far. Another guest came with us in the morning, he too was an Ironman and looking for some time in the water. I knew I would not get any other opportunities to swim this trip so I’m glad I made the most of the bay. Moral is, be brave and just ask if you can swim! All they can say is no. Don’t ask about the ocean life though, it’s better if you don’t know 😉

Ironman 70.3 Taiwan

Race Recap Time!! 

This whole trip to Taiwan was such an unforgettable experience. There is so much to share that made it unique but in this post i’m going to focus on race day itself. Ironman 70.3 Taiwan was my second 70.3 after my first in 2016.  It was a whole different experience this go around. The night before, my friends Jayme, Ben, and I searched for a restaurant we could get some pasta at to safely fuel up. One of the big challenges in destination racing is finding places that will keep your gastric biome happy while being unable to read the menus! When you’re not sure what is exactly in the dish or even what type of meat you are getting picking food can definitely be intimidating.

 

We chose a place called Nu Pasta that seemed safe. Clearly, we were not the only ones with that idea and we had to wait a bit for a table. Our menu options were limited and we all decided to go the safe route with the bolognese on the cover. The food was decent but definitely nothing to write home about. Also not what we were expecting for a bolognese sauce. We wanted safe, and we got safe.

After dinner we walked back to the Sheraton.  We went our separate ways to do final preparations and turn in early.

 

 

Race Morning: 3am

My wake up call came early but I was ready. I’ve never gone into any race with confidence so this feeling was definitely new to me. The lack of butterflies was an interesting change for sure. I went down to breakfast at 3:30 am even though I had brought my own breakfast that I knew worked for me. Kinda Blueberry Granola, usually with almond milk, but this morning I ate it dry. A hard boiled egg for protein and a couple cappuccinos rounded out my meal. I always deal with pretty challenging cramping in my calves towards the end of my swims and I have found that my custom made Infinit does a good job preventing this.  As soon as I was up I started sipping on some trying to get as hydrated as possible.

Course nutrition was posted ahead of time to let us know what would be on course. Naturally we didn’t recognize a single item. I couldn’t experiment ahead of time so I brought all of my supplements from home. Everything was portioned out in zip lock bags. A couple baggies of Infinit, a bag of blue Gatorade, and a bag of Vega Sport’s Recovery Accelerator for post race. I had all of the zip locks, along with my solid nutrition, in a plastic bag and packed it inside of my bike bag.

Since we’d check our bikes into transition the day before I only had to pack a transition bag. This included my wetsuit, helmet, shoes (bike & run), Honey Stinger waffles for the bike, my race belt and some other small items. Pro Tip: I’d been hoarding the complimentary bottled water in the room for the few days before and used those to fill up my bike bottles. Versus trusting the tap in the hotel or near the race course. Better safe than sorry.

Transition Shuttle: 4 am

At 4 am we all headed down to the shuttles over to transition. Sure enough, transition was bustling with people, music, and fluorescent lights. Another little pro tip for the ladies racing in Asia – try to use the bathroom in your hotel room at all costs. The Port-a-pottys in Asia lack an actual toilet seat so they are effectively a porcelin hole in the ground. Not ideal for pre race nerves. There were expensive bikes everywhere here, apparently they are much more afforadable here. That or everyone is super rich and can afford 5 & 6 figure bikes. Cervelo, Felt, Specialized, Giant, and of course Ceepo could be seen all over the course. My wise friend coined the mantra ” Mo Money, Less Fast” to help us not be intimidated.

 

After setting up all of my gear, mixing my various bottles of drink, and squeezing into my wetsuit I headed down to the water to warm up.  The Finish side of the swim course was open for us to warm up at. To get acclimated and loosen up the wetsuits Ben and I swam a quick down and back. Transition typically closes 10-20 minutes before the race starts, meaning everyone has to be out of there. We went straight from our warmup to get queued up at the start.

Swim Start : 6:00 am .. ish

The swim at Flowing Lake was a mass rolling start. After the pros went (around 6:00 am) the rest of us shuffled down the stairs towards the water. The process was slow however it meant the water wasn’t too crowded when we finally got in. It took me 30 minutes to get through the line into the water! The swim course was an easy to follow rectangle. It is as if the lake was built for 70.3s! I felt great during the whole swim – like a shark swimming over my competition.

When racing in Asia expect the swim to be more chaotic than you’re used to. Yes, it is possible! Most competitors here are not strong swimmers and not used to swimming freestyle. Seeing 75% of people swimming breast stroke blew me away. Aside from being irritating it was actually quite dangerous. To have that many unconfident breaststrokers all over the field made the swim challenging. Essentially I swam from pocket to pocket. Trying to avoid the walls of people kicking out all over the place. I finished my swim in 37:13 shaving 8 minutes off my previous time.

T1 : 7:05 am

Transition 1… oh transition 1…

I can’t express how much a long transition run irks me. Luckily, sand was not involved. A long transition run is just what we got in Taitung. You exited the water and then ran almost a half mile in your wetsuit back along the lake. As you can see below you ran down the full length of transition and then all the way back! Personally, not my favorite set up. It took me 7 minutes in T1 to remove my wetsuit and pick up my bike. It pains me.

Bike Course: 7:12 am

The bike was distractingly scenic. The ride was mostly flat and fast. The couple climbs that were on the course were nothing compared to what we train on Guam. On one side you had the beautiful Philippine Sea and on the other you had stunning mountains. Each town we passed through had amazing local fans cheering us in Mandarin. For 56 miles we got to sightsee the southeastern coast of Taiwan and the small farming towns along the way. People tending to their rice paddies and caring for their chickens lined the course.

Our aide station volunteers were very green. Not only did none of them speak English but for many this was their first time working an aide station. The race brief cautioned us to please go slow and be careful at the aide stations. The whole ride I felt like I was comfortably uncomfortable. I was pushing myself and working hard to maintain my 20mph pace. Crossing into T2 with a 2:55 bike was right on target. Essentially the same bike time I had 2 years ago, so I definitely feel there is some room for improvement there.

T2: 10:07 am

T2 was a breeze, a long breeze but still a breeze. I switched to some lock laces for this race and boy did that speed things up! That said, I still had to run the full length of transition to the run-out. In and out of T2 in 4:32 with just one leg to go! Worried I had burnt my legs too much on the bike and wouldn’t be able to have a strong run I knew I’d have to push through the first couple miles.

Run Course: 10:11 am

The run course started around the lake in a big loop and then continued into Taitung Forest Park. While not very shady I did not feel like the course was hot. Warm yes but training on Guam has really upped what my body can handle in terms of internal temperature. The first 5k were a little faster than  my goal pace which felt great. The following 10k was perfectly on pace but my feet and knees were starting to ache. This course was a three loop course and you picked up a little rubber wrist band as you completed a lap.

My mantra for the run was “Stay in Your Lane”. Meaning keep your blinders on – don’t look at what age group others are in, don’t look at what lap they’re on, don’t worry about their race worry about yours. I tried to keep my own personal goals in my mind. The run course was so interesting and enjoyable it was easy to do.

I had a few bad miles that were much slower than I wanted and I felt disappointed. However the last three miles I was able to dig deep and really pull my pace back up to where I was aiming for (9/min miles). To be honest, the red bull station really motivated me! I was running faster just so I could get my fix again!

Overall this run felt great. Anyone who was at Steelhead can attest to how bloody and blistered my feet were, and how bad the cramping was. The lack of those two things alone made the run so much more fun.The last 1.5 miles I fell in step with a man from Hong Kong. We said nothing but we kept shoulder to shoulder at a very uncomfortable pace. Both of us just powering along, pushing each other, making sure we both finished strong. I finished the run in 1:56:15. Unfortunatly, I don’t have a good finishers photo because they lady in front of me ran with a Canadian flag that blocked everyone behind her.

PR Finish: 5th Place AG

While my hope is that as I continue to race overseas, and as this blog grows, more friends and family will go with me to these race-cations. For Taiwan however I flew solo.  I was overcome with love when I picked my phone back up and saw all the texts from people back stateside. Family, friends, and previous teammates from all over the world were tracking me on the Ironman app. It meant the world to me. Finishing 5th in my AG at an Ironman branded event was so exciting. It definitely made me extra excited for the rest of the races this year. The men at the Jeju 70.3 tent already have me thinking about Korea in 2019!!